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The Source

Now we're going to look at the structure of our code. We'll look at the directory structure I (highly) recommend you stick to, as well as a naming convention that will help you manage your code in the long run.

You're free to go outside of this advice, especially if it helps you learn, but just remember that if I refer to a particular file further on in this book, or in the community during a community session, you might struggle to follow along.

Directory Structure

The structure of our Terraform code is very simple, and very flat:

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├── acm.tf
├── alb.tf
├── ec2.tf
├── ec2_eip.tf
├── inputs.tf
├── key_pairs.tf
├── locals.tf
├── main.tf
├── route53.tf
├── security_groups.tf
├── vpc.tf
├── vpc_igw.tf
└── vpc_subnets.tf

We're going to create these files as we go along through the sections of this chapter.

Meta Data

Let's look at each part of the structure in a bit of detail, file by file, and determine a few details:

  1. The filename I (highly) recommend you use
  2. The AWS technology being used, or
  3. Whether the file is specific to Terraform
  4. And the tier it belongs to in the stack

This information is to help you understand where each file fits into the architecture we saw previously.

File Service Tier
main.tf Terraform Meta
locals.tf Terraform Meta
inputs.tf Terraform Meta
key_pairs.tf EC2 Key Pairs Security
vpc.tf Virtual Private Cloud Networking
vpc_igw.tf Internet Gateway Networking
vpc_subnets.tf VPC Subnets Networking
security_groups.tf AWS Security Groups Security
ec2.tf EC2 Instances Compute
ec2_eip.tf Elastic IPs Networking
alb.tf Application Load Balancer Networking
route53.tf AWS Route53 Networking
acm.tf Amazon Certificate Manager Security

Next

Now let's start exploring each of these files, one by one, and writing them out, from top to bottom.


Last update: August 29, 2021